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Economising Culture: On 'The (Digital) Culture Industry'
edited by Geoff Cox, Joasia Krysa & Anya Lewin

contributors:
Carbon Defense League & Conglomco Media Conglomeration | Adam Chmielewski | Jordan Crandall | Gameboyzz Orchestra | Marina Grzinic | Brian Holmes | Margarete Jahrmann | Esther Leslie | Marysia Lewandowska & Neil Cummings |Armin Medosch | Julian Priest & James Stevens | Raqs Media Collective | Mirko Tobias Schäfer | Jeremy Valentine | The Yes Men


publication date:
2004

 


'Interested parties explain the culture industry in technological terms. It is alleged that because millions participate in it, certain reproduction processes are necessary that inevitably require identical needs in innumerable places to be satisfied with identical goods. The technical contrast between the few production centres and the large number of widely dispersed consumption points is said to demand organization and planning by management. Furthermore, it is claimed that standards were based in the first place on consumer's needs, and for that reason were accepted with so little resistance. The result is the circle of manipulation and retroactive need in which the unity of the system grows ever stronger. No mention is made of the fact that the basis on which technology acquires power over society is the power of those whose economic hold over society is the greatest. A technological rationale is the rationale of domination itself.' (Adorno & Horkheimer)

The interaction between culture and economy was famously explored by Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer by the term 'Kulturindustrie' (The Culture Industry) to describe the production of mass culture and power relations between capitalist producers and mass consumers. Their account is a bleak one, but one that appears to hold continuing relevance, despite being written in 1944. Today, the pervasiveness of network technologies has contributed to the further erosion of the rigid boundaries between high art, mass culture and the economy, resulting in new kinds of cultural production charged with contradictions. On the one hand, the culture industry appears to allow for resistant strategies using digital technologies, but on the other it operates in the service of capital in ever more complex ways. This publication, the first in the series, uses the concept of the culture industry as a point of departure, and tests its currency under newconditions.

 

details:

Title ECONOMISING CULTURE: ON ‘THE (DIGITAL) CULTURE INDUSTRY’
Authors Various contributors (see below), edited by Geoff Cox, Joasia Krysa & Anya Lewin
Publisher Autonomedia (DATA browser 01)
Copyright 2004 (all texts released under a Creative Commons License)
ISBN 1-57027-168-2
Pages 256, Paper Perfectbound
Price £15.00 - BUY NOW or FREE DOWNLOAD

 

contents:

INTRODUCTION TO ‘THE (DIGITAL) CULTURE INDUSTRY’ Geoff Cox, Joasia Krysa & Anya Lewin
THE FLEXIBLE PERSONALITY: FOR A NEW CULTURAL CRITIQUE Brian Holmes
HERITAGE The Yes Men
THE MOOD OF NETWORKING CULTURE Jeremy Valentine
AN ECONOMY OF LOVE Marysia Lewandowska & Neil Cummings
GLOBALICA: COMMUNISM, CULTURE AND THE COMMODITY Esther Leslie
RE-CODE.COM Carbon Defense League & Conglomco Media Conglomeration
TRIP THE LOOP, MAKE YOUR SWITCH, CONSUME THE NET Julian Priest & James Stevens
SOCIETY IN AD-HOC MODE: DECENTRALISED, SELF-ORGANISING, MOBILE Armin Medosch
SIGHTINGS Raqs Media Collective
FLEXIBLE COLONISATION Marina Grzinic
LOWTECH MUSIC FOR HIGHTECH PEOPLE Gameboyzz Orchestra
HOMEWORK: THE EXTENSION OF THE CULTURE INDUSTRY Mirko Tobias Schäfer
THE PRESIDENT@WHITEHOUSE.GOV SHOOTER Margarete Jahrmann
ON WARFARE AND REPRESENTATION Jordan Crandall
THE SPECTACLE: GLOBAL AND PARTICULAR Adam J. Chmielewski
NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS

The DATA browser series presents critical texts that explore issues at the intersection of culture and technology. This volume is produced in association with i-DAT.